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Roger FENTON (English, 1819-1869) Kadikoi, from Camp of Horse Artillery, in the Crimea, 1855 Salt print from a collodion negative 25.3 x 34.9 cm, mounted on 50.9 x 64.6 cm heavy paper Photographer's and publisher's credit and title lithographed on mount

Roger Fenton (English, 1819-1869)
Kadikoi, from Camp of Horse Artillery, in the Crimea, 1855
Salt print from a collodion negative
25.3 x 34.9 cm, mounted on 50.9 x 64.6 cm heavy paper
Photographer's and publisher's credit and title lithographed on mount

Made during the Crimean War, this image of the road to Balaklava running past the village of Kadikoi reflects Fenton's mastery of pictorial composition which uses the motif of the serpentine road to lead the eye into the landscape. While soldiers and camp tents are visible in the foreground, the tumult of war is minimized and overshadowed by the expansive vista Fenton's lens has captured.

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Roger FENTON (English, 1819-1869) Landscape with waterfall, 1850s Salt print from a collodion negative 31.5 x 30.6 cm, top corners rounded

Roger Fenton (English, 1819-1869)
Landscape with waterfall, 1850s
Salt print from a collodion negative
31.5 x 30.6 cm, top corners rounded

As a landscape photographer Fenton was without parallel among his contemporaries. His most compelling views of the English, Welsh and Scottish countryside evoke the paintings of Constable and Turner and the Romantic poetry of William Wordsworth. A critic, for the Journal of the Photograhic Society in a review of the annual exhibition in 1858 noted of Fenton's work, "No one can touch Fenton for landscape....There is such an artistic feeling about the whole of these pictures...that they cannot fail to strike the beholder as something more than mere photographs."

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Roger FENTON (English, 1819-1869) Grace Fenton and child, 1850s Salt print from a wet collodion negative 16.2 x 11.3 cm

Roger Fenton (English, 1819-1869)
Grace Fenton and child, 1850s
Salt print from a wet collodion negative
16.2 x 11.3 cm

No other print from this negative is known.

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Roger Fenton (English, 1819-1869) "The Railway Yard, Balaklava" in the Crimea, 1855 Salt print from a collodion negative

Roger Fenton (English, 1819-1869)
"The Railway Yard, Balaklava" in the Crimea, 1855
Salt print from a collodion negative
20.4 x 25.1 cm mounted on 48.0 x 64.4 cm paper
Title "The Railway Yard, Balaklava" printed on mount with "Deposé / No 253 / Photographed by Roger Fenton. Manchester. Published by T. Agnew & Sons, Novr 19th 1855. London, P. & D. Colnaghi & Co. Paris, Moulin 23 Rue Richer. New York, Williams & Co."

The Crimean War was among the first conflicts to utilize the railway as a tactical component.  The construction of the line which Fenton captures in this particular print was a privately undertaken enterprise begun in February 1855 by the engineer James Beatty and funded by Sir Samuel Morton Petro, who in Fenton's own account of his expedition, had funded his passage from Britain to the Crimea. The line was built rapidly and was in use only a few weeks after work commenced.  The railway played a vital role in the success of the British army during the siege of Sevastopol by enabling the uninterrupted transport of supplies, including ammunition, between Balaklava and troops stationed at the front lines. In 1856 after the end of the war, the railway was dismantled.

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Roger FENTON (English, 1819-1869) Volunteer Riflemen on Wimbledon Common, 7 July 1860 Albumen print from a collodion negative 16.1 x 29.7 cm, irregularly trimmed

Roger Fenton (English, 1819-1869)
Volunteer riflemen on Wimbledon Common, 7 July 1860
Albumen print from a collodion negative
16.1 x 29.7 cm, irregularly trimmed

This image was made near the end of his photographic career, part of a series documenting the inaugural meeting of the British National Rifle Association which was presided over by Queen Victoria.

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Roger FENTON (English, 1819-1869) Photographic Art Treasures "Cedars Monmouthshire", Published October 1857 Photogalvanograph 21.5 x 17.6 cm on 25.4 x 22.5 cm paper mounted on 55.8 x 38.5 cm card Printed title and credits

Roger Fenton (English, 1819-1869)
Photographic Art Treasures "Cedars Monmouthshire", Published October 1857
Photogalvanograph
21.5 x 17.6 cm on 25.4 x 22.5 cm paper mounted on 55.8 x 38.5 cm card
Printed title and credits

In early 1856 Roger Fenton began to actively seek a more economical means of reproducing and circulating his photographs to a wider audience. He became impressed by Paul Pretsch's "photo-galvanographic" process which was a photomechanical means of reproducing photographs, drawings or paintings in ink printed on a press. By the end of the year Fenton had joined Pretsch as a partner in the Patent Photo-Galvanographic Company. The company released the first part of "Photographic Art Treasures; or Nature and Art Illustrated by Art and Nature, in late October 1856. Four more parts were to follow which included contributions from not only Fenton alongside others such Robert Howlett and Lake Price.  Fenton's hopes for the endeavor were quickly diminished by the growing realization that the plates themselves were not as durable as previously thought; wearing down after only a few inkings. By May 1857 the company was facing severe financial losses alongside the impending threat of legal action from William Henry Fox Talbot who believed the company had infringed his 1852 patent for photographic engraving.

The failure of Fenton's technological foray does not diminish the visual impact of this particular contribution. Fenton's mastery of perspective is on full display as he captures the physical enormity of the cedar by posing the two diminutive figures at its base. 

Inquire
Roger FENTON (English, 1819-1869) Kadikoi, from Camp of Horse Artillery, in the Crimea, 1855 Salt print from a collodion negative 25.3 x 34.9 cm, mounted on 50.9 x 64.6 cm heavy paper Photographer's and publisher's credit and title lithographed on mount

Roger Fenton (English, 1819-1869)
Kadikoi, from Camp of Horse Artillery, in the Crimea, 1855
Salt print from a collodion negative
25.3 x 34.9 cm, mounted on 50.9 x 64.6 cm heavy paper
Photographer's and publisher's credit and title lithographed on mount

Made during the Crimean War, this image of the road to Balaklava running past the village of Kadikoi reflects Fenton's mastery of pictorial composition which uses the motif of the serpentine road to lead the eye into the landscape. While soldiers and camp tents are visible in the foreground, the tumult of war is minimized and overshadowed by the expansive vista Fenton's lens has captured.

Roger FENTON (English, 1819-1869) Landscape with waterfall, 1850s Salt print from a collodion negative 31.5 x 30.6 cm, top corners rounded

Roger Fenton (English, 1819-1869)
Landscape with waterfall, 1850s
Salt print from a collodion negative
31.5 x 30.6 cm, top corners rounded

As a landscape photographer Fenton was without parallel among his contemporaries. His most compelling views of the English, Welsh and Scottish countryside evoke the paintings of Constable and Turner and the Romantic poetry of William Wordsworth. A critic, for the Journal of the Photograhic Society in a review of the annual exhibition in 1858 noted of Fenton's work, "No one can touch Fenton for landscape....There is such an artistic feeling about the whole of these pictures...that they cannot fail to strike the beholder as something more than mere photographs."

Roger FENTON (English, 1819-1869) Grace Fenton and child, 1850s Salt print from a wet collodion negative 16.2 x 11.3 cm

Roger Fenton (English, 1819-1869)
Grace Fenton and child, 1850s
Salt print from a wet collodion negative
16.2 x 11.3 cm

No other print from this negative is known.

Roger Fenton (English, 1819-1869) "The Railway Yard, Balaklava" in the Crimea, 1855 Salt print from a collodion negative

Roger Fenton (English, 1819-1869)
"The Railway Yard, Balaklava" in the Crimea, 1855
Salt print from a collodion negative
20.4 x 25.1 cm mounted on 48.0 x 64.4 cm paper
Title "The Railway Yard, Balaklava" printed on mount with "Deposé / No 253 / Photographed by Roger Fenton. Manchester. Published by T. Agnew & Sons, Novr 19th 1855. London, P. & D. Colnaghi & Co. Paris, Moulin 23 Rue Richer. New York, Williams & Co."

The Crimean War was among the first conflicts to utilize the railway as a tactical component.  The construction of the line which Fenton captures in this particular print was a privately undertaken enterprise begun in February 1855 by the engineer James Beatty and funded by Sir Samuel Morton Petro, who in Fenton's own account of his expedition, had funded his passage from Britain to the Crimea. The line was built rapidly and was in use only a few weeks after work commenced.  The railway played a vital role in the success of the British army during the siege of Sevastopol by enabling the uninterrupted transport of supplies, including ammunition, between Balaklava and troops stationed at the front lines. In 1856 after the end of the war, the railway was dismantled.

Roger FENTON (English, 1819-1869) Volunteer Riflemen on Wimbledon Common, 7 July 1860 Albumen print from a collodion negative 16.1 x 29.7 cm, irregularly trimmed

Roger Fenton (English, 1819-1869)
Volunteer riflemen on Wimbledon Common, 7 July 1860
Albumen print from a collodion negative
16.1 x 29.7 cm, irregularly trimmed

This image was made near the end of his photographic career, part of a series documenting the inaugural meeting of the British National Rifle Association which was presided over by Queen Victoria.

Roger FENTON (English, 1819-1869) Photographic Art Treasures "Cedars Monmouthshire", Published October 1857 Photogalvanograph 21.5 x 17.6 cm on 25.4 x 22.5 cm paper mounted on 55.8 x 38.5 cm card Printed title and credits

Roger Fenton (English, 1819-1869)
Photographic Art Treasures "Cedars Monmouthshire", Published October 1857
Photogalvanograph
21.5 x 17.6 cm on 25.4 x 22.5 cm paper mounted on 55.8 x 38.5 cm card
Printed title and credits

In early 1856 Roger Fenton began to actively seek a more economical means of reproducing and circulating his photographs to a wider audience. He became impressed by Paul Pretsch's "photo-galvanographic" process which was a photomechanical means of reproducing photographs, drawings or paintings in ink printed on a press. By the end of the year Fenton had joined Pretsch as a partner in the Patent Photo-Galvanographic Company. The company released the first part of "Photographic Art Treasures; or Nature and Art Illustrated by Art and Nature, in late October 1856. Four more parts were to follow which included contributions from not only Fenton alongside others such Robert Howlett and Lake Price.  Fenton's hopes for the endeavor were quickly diminished by the growing realization that the plates themselves were not as durable as previously thought; wearing down after only a few inkings. By May 1857 the company was facing severe financial losses alongside the impending threat of legal action from William Henry Fox Talbot who believed the company had infringed his 1852 patent for photographic engraving.

The failure of Fenton's technological foray does not diminish the visual impact of this particular contribution. Fenton's mastery of perspective is on full display as he captures the physical enormity of the cedar by posing the two diminutive figures at its base. 

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